Australian flag s33.727473e151.235952.com.au Argentina flag s36.611388w56.706666.com.ar Hong Kong flag n22.228900e113.936487.hk Argentina flag s36.486052w56.694045.com.ar Australian flag s33.806901e151.299299.com.au Hong Kong flag n22.215719e114.248988.hk South African flag s33.953939e18.375759.co.za Swedish flag n57.675322e11.662511.se Hong Kong flag n22.210230e114.256256.hk South African flag s33.943225e18.394233.co.za Hong Kong flag n22.207525e114.258659.hk Australian flag s33.734152e151.304727.com.au Argentina flag s36.341944w56.737500.com.ar Hong Kong flag n22.228878e113.936946.hk Swedish flag n59.329452e18.132398.se American flag n40.733106w72.870375.us.com French flag n50.204520e1.538171.fr Swedish flag n57.680235e11.668160.se South African flag s33.953625e18.375743.co.za French flag n48.879773e2.367629.fr American flag n40.756073w72.930950.us.com Australian flag s33.848846e151.173501.com.au Argentina flag s36.506111w56.713333.com.ar Hong Kong flag n22.230210e113.940187.hk Argentina flag s36.506111w56.713055.com.ar Australian flag s33.851850e151.244960.com.au South African flag s36.787854e174.775050.co.nz Swedish flag n57.630653e11.878293.se Hong Kong flag n22.208606e114.256798.hk New Zealand flag s36.784432e174.777591.co.nz South African flag s33.372844e18.179869.co.za Swedish flag n57.889503e11.685638.se Australian flag s33.843574e151.144477.com.au Swedish flag n59.363142e18.254658.se French flag n50.216722e1.566312.fr South African flag s33.952939e18.377052.co.za South African flag s33.943910e18.383490.co.za Australian flag s33.820180e151.184813.com.au Swedish flag n57.888698e11.688815.se Argentina flag s36.479351w56.697737.com.ar Australian flag s33.898239e151.275644.com.au Hong Kong flag n22.210512e114.256075.hk South African flag s33.336681e18.160858.co.za Hong Kong flag n22.209240e114.257359.hk Australian flag s33.844228e151.144557.com.au New Zealand flag s36.809596e174.417374.co.nz South African flag s33.918960e18.399536.co.za Australian flag s33.849695e151.244546.com.au South African flag s33.946096e18.393967.co.za New Zealand flag s36.810855e174.422624.co.nz Swedish flag n59.329736e18.132242.se Hong Kong flag n22.208887e114.258440.hk Australian flag s33.851451e151.286459.com.au
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Connecting you to the landscape of the internet

More info

Red Lines is a network containing infrared videos of coastal landscapes that can be streamed to a smartphone, tablet, or computer by anyone, anywhere.

By setting a device in your home or workplace to display this artwork, you share a synchronized viewing experience with people around the world. Filmed in infrared, the spectrum by which data is transmitted through fiber optic cables, over 50 slowly moving videos are stored on servers located in the same territories in which they were filmed. When you view a network located video made in Hong Kong, for example, it activates the submarine cable route between Hong Kong and you. You then become part of the peer-to-peer network which enables this work to be experienced by people around you.

These network located videos were shot at fiber optic cable landing locations in Australia, Argentina, France, Hong Kong, New Zealand, South Africa, Sweden, and the United States. During the following year, more trips will be made and the network will expand.

Red Lines runs from September 10, 2018 until September 10, 2019.

How to

To view piece go to http://p2p.redlines.network

Setting up Red Lines

Red Lines is designed to be lived with at home or in your workplace. Devices should ideally be plugged into power and connected to an internet connection with no data limits (check with your service provider) and the browser set to http://p2p.redlines.network.

Read on for instructions for specific devices.

iPhone or iPad
  1. Open Safari and visit https://p2p.redlines.network.

  2. Save the URL to your home screen by tapping the icon at the bottom of your screen that looks like a square with an arrow pointing upwards and then scroll through the options until you see ‘Add to Home Screen’. Tap ‘Add’ to save this site to your home screen with the suggested title of ‘Red Lines’.

  3. Close this browser window and return to your home screen, you will see a Red Lines icon. Launch the app from this icon and it will display full screen. You are now running Red Lines from your device.



TIPS:

  • Red Lines requires iOS 10 and above. This means compatible devices are iPhone 5 or more recent, iPad 4th Gen, iPad mini 2+, or any iPad Air or iPad Pro.

  • Adjust your screen brightness to its maximum setting.

  • Set your auto-lock timer to “never” so the screen does not turn itself off while you are running Red Lines.

  • You might want to turn off other app notifications or set your phone to “do not disturb” mode.

  • When choosing a location for Red Lines to live, it might help to think of it as like a family photograph or postcard. As phone screens are smaller, consider placing them at eye level somewhere you spend a lot of time in your home or workplace. To protect your device’s battery, always power your device from a dedicated outlet rather than a USB port on another computing device which might not always be turned on.

  • If your USB cable isn’t long enough to reach the desired installation location you could use a USB adaptor to connect together multiple cables. For instance, a USB 2.0 A socket to micro socket adaptor will allow you to extend your Apple Lightning charging cable with a more standard (and cheaper) USB 2.0 A to micro USB cable. This project is in part about infrastructure so embrace your cables (10ft red braided USB cables are a personal favorite).

  • In terms of keeping your phone upright and on display while also charging, there are many commercially available products such as stands and tripods, clamps for shelves and tables, suction-based mounts for smooth surfaces. For those regularly using a laptop, a mobile phone laptop mount can be employed. Also consider a DIY approach, perhaps using materials you have available already.

  • If you don’t have an unused phone or tablet to dedicate to Red Lines, there are ways of using your everyday mobile device as a viewing platform by making small changes to the way you ordinarily use it. Instead of leaving your phone in your pocket or bag while you work, make docking your device to charge and launching Red Lines part of your daily routine. An added benefit of this technique is that the artwork can move with you when you travel or are away from home and it can act as a deterrent for using your phone for other activities.

  • For technical reasons, it is not possible to run Red Lines on iPhone 4 or earlier or iPad 3rd Gen or earlier. If you are interested in running a simulated version of the piece on pre iOS 10 devices you can try this link: http://redlines.network/sim.

  • For those interested in a truly full screen experience of the work (without the time, battery and connection indicator at the top of the screen), this can be accomplished by using the AsstiveTouch feature. First, make sure you have the Red Lines icon on your home screen (instructions on how to do this listed are above). Then, enable AsstiveTouch on your phone by going to Settings -> General -> Accessibility -> AssistiveTouch, and toggle the switch to on. Then go to Settings -> General -> Accessibility -> Accessibility Shortcut and make sure there is a check mark next to AssistiveTouch (if so hit the home button to exit back to your home screen). Next, if the circular white AssitiveTouch menu is not already visible, then triple click the home button to bring it up. Launch Red Lines by clicking the app icon on your phone's home screen, click the white circular menu, click Device, click Rotate Screen, click Left, click anywhere on the screen away from the menu to minimize the AssistiveTouch menu and then triple click the home button (select AssistiveTouch if asked) to minimize the menu. At this point you should be left with a completely full screen implementation of Red Lines. Click the home button once at anytime to exit back to your home screen.

  • If your phone stand blocks your charging port on the bottom of the phone, you can use the AssistiveTouch feature mentioned above but click "Right" to rotate the screen 180 degrees, leaving your charging port accessible on the top of the phone.

Android phone or tablet
  1. Open Opera (preferred), Chrome or Firefox and visit https://p2p.redlines.network.

  2. Save the URL to your home screen by hitting the 3 dots icon in the upper right corner of your screen and then scroll through the options until you see ‘Add to Home Screen’. Tap ‘Add’ to save this site to your home screen with the suggested title of ‘Red Lines’.

  3. Close this browser window and return to your home screen, you will see a Red Lines icon. Launch the app from this icon and it will display full screen. You are now running Red Lines from your device.



TIPS:

  • Red Lines will run on most mobile devices running Android 5 or higher, and should be run on the latest browser version.

  • Adjust your screen brightness to its maximum setting.

  • Set your auto-lock timer to “never” so the screen does not turn itself off while you are running Red Lines.

  • You might want to turn off other app notifications or set your phone to “do not disturb” mode.

  • When choosing a location for Red Lines to live, it might help to think of it as like a family photograph or postcard. As phone screens are smaller, consider placing them at eye level somewhere you spend a lot of time in your home or workplace. To protect your device’s battery, always power your device from a dedicated outlet rather than a USB port on another computing device which might not always be turned on.

  • If your USB cable isn’t long enough to reach the desired installation location you could use a USB adaptor to connect together multiple cables. For instance, a USB 2.0 A socket to micro socket adaptor will allow you to extend your phone's charging cable with a more standard (and cheaper) USB 2.0 A to micro USB cable. This project is in part about infrastructure so embrace your cables (10ft red braided USB cables are a personal favorite).

  • In terms of keeping your phone upright and on display while also charging, there are many commercially available products such as stands and tripods, clamps for shelves and tables, suction-based mounts for smooth surfaces. For those regularly using a laptop, a mobile phone laptop mount can be employed. Also consider a DIY approach, perhaps using materials you have available already.

  • If you don’t have an unused phone or tablet to dedicate to Red Lines, there are ways of using your everyday mobile device as a viewing platform by making small changes to the way you ordinarily use it. Instead of leaving your phone in your pocket or bag while you work, make docking your device to charge and launching Red Lines part of your daily routine. An added benefit of this technique is that the artwork can move with you when you travel or are away from home and it can act as a deterrent for using your phone for other activities.

  • If you have trouble running Red Lines you can also try the non-p2p version (https://redlines.network/redline) or the simulated version (https://redlines.network/sim).

  • For those interested in a truly full screen experience of the work (without the time, battery and connection indicator at the top of the screen) first download Opera from the Play store. Launch Opera and go to http://p2p.redlines.network, click the three dots in the upper right corner and select "Home screen". Then go to the Play store and download Fulscrn Free. After installing Fulscrn then launch Red Lines from the icon on your phone's Desktop.

Laptop / desktop computer
  1. Open Firefox, Chrome or Safari and visit https://p2p.redlines.network.

  2. Set your browser to display full screen.

  3. Orient device so that the video seen is upright. If you're on a laptop, turn it on its side (so it's open like a book) with the power cable at the top. Tap ‘r’ to flip the screen 180° if necessary.



TIPS:

  • Adjust your screen brightness to its maximum setting.

  • So that the display does not go to sleep, turn off power saving and screen saver options.

  • When turning your computer on its side, make sure not to block any air intake or exhaust openings.

  • If you don’t have an unused laptop or computer to dedicate to running Red Lines, there are ways of using your everyday computer as a viewing platform by making small changes to your working habits. Experiment with arranging your desktop windows so that your work and Red Lines are both visible, or use a browser plugin like Side View for FireFox that will allow you to work in two separate frames in one browser.

Screen / TV / monitor
  • If you’d like to display the work on a larger screen, an external monitor can be run from any internet connected computer and many smartphones and tablets using the correct adaptors and cables. See instructions above.

  • Note that the network located videos are at 720p resolution so clarity of the image will change once the screen size becomes very large.

  • Check back here In the coming weeks to download a bootable Linux disk image which will allow you to use any PC to auto-launch Red Lines full screen to any connected monitor.

user submitted photo

Audience photographs

We have published photographs by the beta testers of this project in their homes and workplaces to help the growing community see ways of living with this work.

If you’re happy sharing your images, you can do so via this form or by sharing online using the hashtag #redlines.

Gallery
user submitted photo from Bangalore August 2018
Archana Prasad, Bangalore. August 2018
user submitted photo from Gaithersburg August 2018
Sakineh Walther, Gaithersburg. August 2018
user submitted photo from Berlin July 2018
Monika Dorniak, Berlin. July 2018
user submitted photo from Istanbul July 2018
Beyza Dilem Toptal, Istanbul. July 2018
user submitted photo July 2018
Erfan Rezaie, Vancouver. July 2018
user submitted photo from Paris September 2018
Jerome Saint-Clair, Paris. September 2018
user submitted photo July 2018
Likando Kumoyo, London. July 2018
user submitted photo fro Berlin August 2018
Manuel Bürger, Berlin. September 2018
user submitted photo from London August 2018
London, August 2018
user submitted photo from Calcutta August 2018
Veda Aggarwall by Jhinku Banerjee, Calcutta. August 2018
user submitted photo from Calcutta August 2018
Lily Blacksell by Andy Donohoe, London. August 2018
user submitted photo from Calcutta August 2018
Posy Dixon, London. August 2018
user submitted photo from Ljubljana, Slovenia 2018
Aksioma, Ljubljana, Slovenia. November 2018
user submitted photo from Durham, North Carolina, 2018
Kelly Roth, Durham, North Carolina. November 2018
user submitted photo from Seoul, South Korea, 2018
Elliot Woods (kimchiandchips.com), Seoul, South Korea. November 2018

About the artist

More info

Evan Roth was selected from the 2017 Artangel Everywhere open call for proposals to produce a major project that can be experienced anywhere in the world.

Based in Berlin, Roth's practice visualizes and archives typically unseen aspects of rapidly changing communication technologies. Through a range of media from sculpture to websites, the work addresses the personal and cultural effects surrounding these changes and the role of individual agency within the media landscape.

Roth is the co-founder of the Graffiti Research Lab and the Free Art & Technology Lab (F.A.T. Lab) and his work has been exhibited at the Tate and Whitechapel Gallery and is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art NYC.

About Artangel

More info

Artangel are a London-based public arts organisation that commission and produce extraordinary art in unexpected places.

For over 30 years, Artangel has generated some of the most talked-about art of recent times, including Rachel Whiteread’s House (1993), Jeremy Deller’s The Battle of Orgreave (2001) Michael Landy’s Break Down (2001), Inside - Artists and Writers in Reading Prison (2016) and, most recently, Andy Holden and Peter Holden’s Natural Selection (2017) and Taryn Simon’s An Occupation of Loss (2018).

Artangel projects have taken place in a wide range of sites including the night sky over London, in a power station a mile beneath a Scottish mountain, an empty prison, and a quarry on the Isle of Portland. Red Lines is the first truly global networked Artangel commission.

Network Located Videos

Red Lines is currently comprised of 53 individual network located videos, filmed in eight countries on six continents, with durations between three minutes 26 seconds and 19 minutes 48 seconds, totalling over 12 hours. All but one depicts a landscape where the cables that form our intercontinental connections emerge from the sea.

The URL of each individual network located video in Red Lines is listed below:

Help

Get help setting up Red Lines on your device:

Please allow a few days for a response.

Check @RedlinesStatus on Twitter for updates about any problems or downtime in the network.

Credits

More info

Red Lines is commissioned and produced by Artangel. The project is generously supported by Creative Capital.

Artangel is generously supported using public funding by Arts Council England, and by the private patronage of Artangel International Circle, Special Angels and The Company of Angels.

Developed by Cosmic.berlin using WebTorrent.

Project website designed by Manuel Buerger.

Lead photos by Tobias Faisst with compositing by Tom Hadley.





Thanks to:
Charmian Griffin, Paul Bille, Monika Dorniak, Archana Prasad, Jemima Kiss, Geraldine Juarez, Hasan Elahi, Ophelia Hanson, Erik Nordenhake, Bronwyn Holloway Smith, James Bridle, Piratbyrån, Olia Lialina, All of the beta testers, Sakineh Walther, Andrew Blum, TeleGeography, Carroll/Fletcher, 20th Biennale of Sydney, Mona Bismarck American Center, Masters and Servers, Coline Milliard*, Domenico Quaranta*, Nadim Samman*, Aksioma*, the Awesome Foundation (Ottawa) and 6PM Your Local Time.



Kopimi

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